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Author: Ian Burley

Guard yourself from fake memory cards

With a trained eye you can spot that the ‘4’ in 64GB is not the same typeface as on a genuine SanDisk card.

Fake or counterfeit memory cards that look like premium branded product, including convincing retail packaging, are a problem that everyone should take seriously.

What is a fake or counterfeit memory card?

Ciunterfeits will often look just like the real thing. Even slick retail packaging can be faked. Fake cards will often not have as much actual storage capacity as they claim and read/write speeds will be a lot slower. It may also be possible to spot visual clues as well. The counterfeiters can make cards that have much smaller usable capacity appear to contain a much higher capacity. These hacked cards work at first but once the memory has been used up, files already on the card start to be overwritten, causing file corruption.

Fake memory cards can do this to your files

About 18 months ago I saw a good deal on eBay for a 64GB SanDisk Extreme UHS-1 microSDXC memory card – ideal for my phone, I thought. It arrived and came, as advertised, in retail packaging. I was pleased. Much later, when downloaded music started playing back unreliably, and then photos and videos started to get corrupted, did the consequences of receiving a fake memory card come home to roost. By then the eBay seller was long gone and it was far too late to get any recompense.

A genuine SanDisk card

Before I suspected my card of being a fake, I thought it was only faulty. I tried scanning it for errors on my PC. Errors were found and, according to Windows, were fixed. But the problems eventually returned. Next, I tried a ‘slow’ re-format of the card, as opposed to a ‘quick’ format option. A quick format only reinitialises the table of contents, not the actual data across the entire card space. By un-checking ‘quick format’ you will reset all sectors on the card. This method should, in theory, uncover any bad sectors. But the reformat seemed to work fine. Surprise, surprise, file corruption eventually returned.

Suspecting your card is a fake

By this time I did some more simple tests. Copying large files to and from the card showed that the read speed was, incredibly, only 3MB/second and the write speed was, perversely, faster, but still a lethargic 7MB/second.  A 64GB SanDisk Extreme UHS-1 microSDXC card should allow data to be read at around 80MB/sec and written at 50MB/sec. It was beginning to dawn on me that this wasn’t a real SanDisk Extreme card, but a counterfeit. Later on I also spotted that one of the typefaces on the card itself did not match that of a genuine card.

Get the evidence for a refund or replacement

You can avoid an experience like this easily. All you need to do is test your brand new memory card as soon as you receive it. Don’t delay; the sooner you know the card is a fake, the better your chances are of getting recompense. Only buy via respected or protected sources; eBay and Amazon, for example, will help you get a refund or replacement even if the original seller does not cooperate. All you need is proof your card is fake. Here is how to do exactly that.

Green means good – this card has passed the test

 

After doing a little research I decided to use a free Windows utility called a h2testw which you can download from Softpedia: http://www.softpedia.com/get/System/System-Miscellaneous/H2testw.shtml. Mac users can use a similar utility called F3 downloadable from http://oss.digirati.com.br/f3/

Confirmation it’s a fake

The h2test2w utility writes to every sector in the card’s memory map as well as verifying and speed testing. It is capable of overcoming false capacity hacking of the card’s specifications. After running the utility it was clear that my 64GB SanDisk Extreme card was a fake, with only 8GB capacity, despite appearing to Windows and my phone as a 64GB card.

Red means trouble and a large proportion of the stated card capacity is non-existent.

I’d also recently bought a couple of other cards, one of which was another steal of a deal on an eBay auction; a Panasonic V90 U3 64GB SDXC card, which normally sells for £200. My £55 auction win needed urgent validation! Thankfully, it passed the test with flying colours. I already had one of these cards so tested that as well and the results were pretty much identical.

The testing process can take a while, depending on the speed of the card, but it’s a great way to make sure you’re getting what you paid for. It can also serve to identify a genuine product that is non-maliciously faulty. I will be testing all new card purchases from now on.

 

The Photography Show starts today!

This year’s The Photography Show starts today at the rather cold and snowy Birmingham National Exhibition Centre (NEC).

I’m here at the show today to search out the show highlight, including interesting exhibits and show gear deals.

Here’s my first update from the show; a gallery of shots from WEX, Cameraworld and LCE, who are the main three camera retailers exhibiting this year:

Meanwhile, all the main camera marques are exhibiting. It has to be said the Nikon stand, although located in a prime position near the main entrance, seems smaller and less visible than it has been in the past. Canon has a massive stand at the opposite end of the hall, complete with cavernous presentation theatre. Olympus, Panasonic, Sony and Fujifilm occupy the centre of the hall with spaciously large stands. Pentax/Ricoh are off to one side with a rather more modest sized stand. Sigma again has a large and impressive stand to show off its wares. Tamron’s is more modest. A gallery of shots from the show aisles will follow later.

For more information about the exhibitors attending and the parallel events, including talks by great name photographers, check out The Photography Show official website.

 

Canon and Nikon to ‘legitimise’ Mirrorless System Camera market

Is Canon heralding a bid for dominance of the mirrorless system camera market?

If there is one thing that emerged from the recent CP+ photography trade show in Japan it was confirmation that mirrorless cameras will finally take over from DSLRs. Canon bosses are reportedly targeting domination of the mirrorless system camera sector after years of fairly innocuous involvement at the fringes. An interview by the DPReview mega site with Sony’s camera division General Manager, Kenji Tanaka, appeared to confirm Canon’s intentions and more.

Sony, Fujifilm, Olympus and Panasonic Lumix, currently own the mirrorless system camera market. Nikon and Canon have, instead, tinkered with mirrorless cameras, carefully avoiding unnecessary competition with their established domination of the DSLR sphere.

Tough times for all system cameras

However, system camera sales across the board, including mirrorless, but especially DSLRs, are facing tough competition from the ubiquity and improving quality and usability of cameras in smartphones. But it seems mirrorless is now recognised as the more profitable and sustainable avenue for the future of system cameras.

Sony’s Tanaka not only expects Canon to invest heavily in mirrorless, especially full frame, but Nikon, too. While they can technically claim to have been a reasonably early participant in the mirrorless revolution, Nikon went for a small 1 inch sensor format for its Nikon 1 system. Sales never really took off and there hasn’t been much in the way of new Nikon 1 releases for some time. Canon has been very conservative with its EOS-M mirrorless system, though its more recent models like the EOS-M5 and M50 show a rapid expansion in Canon’s ambitions, albeit still only in the consumer sector.

Professionals will be key

Despite the arrival of some increasingly impressive professional specification mirrorless cameras, DSLRs are still the mainstay of most high visibility press, sports and wildlife photographers. Nikon and Canon DSLR shooters value not only the excellence of their gear but also the extensive and vital professional support provided by the two big marques.

But there is no getting away from the facts. DSLRs and their lenses are relatively big, heavy, and now no longer as dominant in image quality and performance in other technical areas like autofocus and shooting speed. DSLRs are also mechanically more delicate and complicated to manufacture. A lot of specialist professionals have switched away from Nikon in order to lighten their camera bags.

Legitimacy

Meanwhile, features like video, image stabilisation and new trick functionalities are giving mirrorless cameras key advantages and genuine appeal for professionals. Nikon and Canon are going to be duty-bound to provide professional grade mirrorless cameras for their legions of professional photographers. This will finally endow the mirrorless sector with the professional legitimacy it has sought to achieve for so long.

Panasonic Lumix invented the modern mirrorless phenomenon ten years ago when it launched the Micro Four Thirds system via the Lumix G1. It’s taken a long time, much longer than mirrorless fans predicted, but there are now clear signs that the dominance of the SLR era really is about to end.

Make your old film camera digital – I’m Back

Somewhere in Italy, photography enthusiast, Samuel Mello Medeiros, is living his dream to bring thousands of neglected film cameras back from obscurity and into the digital era. His project to replace 35mm film canisters with a digital sensor module that can, in relative terms, be easily transplanted in to a wide variety of old cameras, is now in full swing thanks to Kickstarter crowd funding. The product of Medeiros’ labours is called ‘I’m Back’ and designed to be affordable, too.

Laughable? Maybe not

Digital replacements for film in 35mm cameras have had a laughable history. In the late 1990s an outfit called Silicon Film tried to develop a solutions called EFS-1. It never made it to market. More recently in 2011 the idea was re-hashed via a website called www.re35.com. This was launched on 1st of April by a German company that had no product, but simply sought to demonstrate that there was real interest in such a goal. You may be tempted to greet the I’m Back news with some suspicion, but to date the signs are looking positive.

Affordable

Medeiros has more than achieved his pledge targets on Kickstarter. His design appears to be functional and the specifications look realistically cheap enough to not be vapourware. The electronics are based around the popular and inexpensive Raspberry Pie versatile microcomputer board. It’s mated to an off the shelf Ambarella image processor. Another relatively inexpensive component – a 2/3rd inch 16 megapixel image sensor made by Panasonic. That’s a compact camera sensor, incidentally, with a cropping factor of around 4x.

A mirror diverts the host camera’s field of view downwards to the sensor. Everything is housed in a simple plastic module that can be screwed to the base of the host camera once the film compartment door has been removed. Medeiros says that potentially hundreds of film camera models can take variants of the I’m Back device. A finished ready-ti-use product is promised for May this year. If you’re that way inclined you can save a large chunk of the €175 price tag by purchasing a kit or even the blueprints for your own DIY build.

Clearly I’m Back is not about full frame camera image quality aspirations. Instead, Medeiros says it should interest those attracted to Lomography and pin-hole photography.

Check out the official I’m Back website and the I’m Back Kickstarter page.

Three Legged Think and the Return of Brian

Award-winning British tripod maker, 3 Legged Thing announces the return of their iconic, hero, travel tripod, Brian, with new and refined features.

STAGSDEN, BEFORDSHIRE – 12th March 2018
He’s back! 3 Legged Thing’s most iconic tripod has been given an extensive facelift, and now joins 3LT’s Punks range of tripods. Thoroughly refined and improved, the new Punks Brian is a true travel tripod – lightweight for portability at only 1.45 kg / 3.1 lb, and compact for transportation, folding to just 41 cm / 16.5 “. Brian’s travel pedigree does not forsake any capability as his 2 column sections and 5 leg sections offer ultimate versatility, as well as a maximum height of 1.87 m / 74 “.

Danny Lenihan, 3 Legged Thing’s Founder & CEO explains the return: “Brian was our first ever tripod, and the catalyst for our naming trend, and inspiration for all the brands that have followed suit. We retired Brian after four incarnations – 1st Gen, 2nd Gen, Evo 2 and Evo 3, back in 2015, with a heavy heart. At the time we felt we needed a fresh angle. We’ve missed him every day since, and so I am so excited to announce his return, but this time as part of our iconic Punks range.”

The brand new Punks Brian will be unveiled at The Photography Show, which takes place at the NEC, Birmingham from 17-20th March 2018, and can be viewed at 3 Legged Thing’s exhibition stand no E71 throughout the show.

Designed and engineered in Stagsden, England, Punks Brian is made from eight layers of 100% pure pre-preg carbon fibre, and includes all the premium features users expect from 3 Legged Thing tripods. These include a detachable monopod leg; patented Tri-mount plate which allows the attachment of accessories; removable and reversible centre column; ultra-low-level shooting using the widest 80 ̊ leg angle; and ergonomic, water-dispersing bubble-grips which provide better leverage, even in damp conditions.

Like 3 Legged Thing’s other tripods, Brian includes modular functionality, enabling users to remove, attach and reconfigure elements of the tripod allowing a multitude of uses. This includes the removable centre column which allows use of the tripod as low as 11 cm / 4.3”, and can also be added to the detachable monopod leg to create an ultra-tall monopod that extends to 1.92 m / 75.5”.

Available in two colourways – grey and blue with copper accents; and matte black with accents of British Racing Green – Punks Brian additionally includes an AirHed Neo ballhead which incorporates two spirit level bubbles; a tough nylon drawstring carry bag; and rubber Bootz footwear which grip a variety of surfaces. Brian’s footwear can be changed to suit different terrains, and 3 Legged Thing offers Heelz, Clawz, and Stilettoz for sale separately.

Brian is available to pre-order from 12th March, and will be available online and via camera retailers worldwide from 2nd April 2018.

# # #

Headquartered in a converted chicken shed (The Chicken Shed) on Kinsbourne Farm, in Stagsden, Bedfordshire, 3 Legged Thing is a small, British company of passionate people, creating and innovating camera support systems for photographers and videographers. 3 Legged Thing is the Winner of the Lucie Technical Award’s 2017 Tripod of the Year.

 

Legendary Bowens lighting company to go dark

Goodbye Bowens

There are widespread reports from the photo industry that Bowens Lighting is to go into liquidation. The company would have celebrated its centenary in just 6 years time.

Bowens used to rule the roost when it came to lighting rigs for professional photographers. Countless stars and celebrities over the decades where illuminated by Bowens lighting in studios and on location across the globe. So dominant was the company that the company name was often used as the noun that described a photographer’s lighting, particularly studio flash lighting in more recent years.

The company started in the UK as a camera repair specialist in 1923 and later found its niche in studio lighting. It’s true to say that the industry segment Bowens once dominated has now become crowded and very competitive.

  • Do you use Bowens gear – what does the bad news mean to you?
  • Have you switched away from Bowens and, why?
  • Do you have any memorable anecdotes about using Bowens lighting over the years?

Tell us now via the comment box below; we’d love to hear from you!

Are you respecting image copyright?

Press release issued by Copytrack:

Copytrack

Finally revealed: TOP 10 Errors of image use online

Berlin, 11 July 2017: If we´re all honest it´s incredibly easy to find images online. But there’s always that doubt “can I use just use this image or do I still have to ask for permission?” To help with these concerns Copytrack introduces the top ten biggest misunderstandings of using unknown images online. A massive issue on internet, especially on social media.

1.No crop can cut copyright: Altered pictures are copyrighted

When someone wants to edit a photo, whether it´s changing colour, size and then use it for their own purpose, the copyright still needs to be obtained. Only if “free use” is stated or the original image is barely recognizable, permission from the copyright holder is not needed.  You have to be careful what “free use” means though, as it varies for each image.

2.Not true: A lawfully acquired license lets you do everything

In order to be able to advertise a product range, companies hire photographers to create product pictures and then acquire special licenses for images. The terms of the licenses are usually very specific, and the picture can´t simply be used for other purposes. The manufacturers’ licenses do not automatically apply to the product distributors.

3.Extra, extra, read all about it: Newspapers spread easily online

Scans, screenshots or photos from newspaper articles are often shared a lot online. However, copyright still needs to be taken into consideration when sharing newspaper articles. The publishers are usually legal owners of the texts. But that might not be the same when it comes to the pictures.

4.Always check: The worldwide web can be a large free image database

Searching for images on the net is very easy and fruitful. However, images extracted from search engines are still copyrighted. Often the image sources and the copyright owners are not immediately visible. Despite this the copyright owner always has to be researched and the conditions for the image usage have to be clarified. Otherwise you could be paying for your mistake.

5.Ignorance is not bliss: Licenses can be distributed easily

Anyone commissioning an image and acquiring the license for the use of this image does not automatically have the right to pass the image on to a third party. Copytrack has a lot of experience of dealing with cases where images are shared to third parties without a proper licence.  When the third party uses the image without a proper license- he is still at risk. Licenses always need to be checked.

6.How free can it be? Make sure you understand CC licences

Images marked with a creative commons licence are actually available free of charge to the delight of many. But they are still copyrighted. Before use, it is also necessary to check the terms of the CC license as they vary, for example check if the photo be edited or can it be used for commercial use.

7.Mistake: copyright protection is not just for private individuals

Here is a double misunderstanding of many image users: not only professional photographers, but also amateurs have instant copyright when creating photos.

Secondly, it is irrelevant whether or not an image has been used for private or commercial purposes. Unauthorized use can always lead to copyright abuse.

8.Mistake: Stock photos can be used as desired

If you want to use stock images, you acquire a certain license (standard or exclusive), which may look different for editorial or commercial use. If a stock image is used onto a company blog, this can soon be confused with editorial use. However, since the blog is a company and this usually increases the click rate, a commercial usage license must be purchased. When purchasing a standard license for commercial image use, it is also important to note that stock images, which are distributed online, have different licensing rules depending on the site that sells them.

9.Irritating: Everything made, can´t always be sellable

Using an image without permission is illegal. Just because others might do the same, it doesn’t mean you’re protected. Individuals are always responsible to check they have the right to use photos online. Those who make these mistakes are just the same as image right abusers. Ignorance helps nobody when it comes to image rights, so always be aware of what you´re sharing.

10.eBay- Auctions offers with product photos

Whoever uses original product photos for private eBay auctions puts themselves at risk of image theft. When someone sells a product they don’t suddenly get the right to use the original product photos. The best option is to take a little time and take a photo yourself.

About Copytrack:

Copytrack (www.copytrack.com) was founded in 2015 by Marcus Schmitt and currently employs around 25 people from legal, IT, customer service and finance. The service supports photographers, publishers, image agencies and e-commerce providers. It includes a risk-free search of the global Internet for image and graphics data uploaded by users at Copytrack are found with a hit accuracy of 98 per cent. The customers define if images are used without a license and even determine the amount of subsequent fees supported by an automatic license calculator on the portal. Copytrack is fully responsible for an out-of-court solution in over 140 countries as well as a legal solution in the areas relevant to copyright law. If the image has been successfully licensed, the rights holder receives up to 70 percent of the agreed sum. The pure search function is free of charge.